Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Renewed assaults

Whole front, 1st August 1713


In the first week of August 1713, the Spanish armies stopped their progression into Catalonia, giving priority instead to smashing the numerous focus of resistance their previous moves had met on the way. At South, the defenders of Tivissa town impavidly watched the impressive redeployment of their enemy, ready to launch a second, likely definitive assault. They had been cut their supply lines, so that could only rely on the scarce food available into the town. But there wasn't enough of it for all... In the meanwhile, the Army Group Centre restarted their fierce assaults against the desperate villagers of Cervera and Montblanc, and the Army Group North remained scattered for foraging while their rearguard was preparing the siege of Balaguer city.

On their side, French armies made no further progressions into Catalan territory either, and all along the front the only observed activity was at Sant Feliu de Guíxols town, where the French garrison was still holding their position against increasing enemy forces, although they likely wouldn't be able to keep holding them for long. However, rearguard moves by that sector seemed to point at a French counter-offensive in a short time...

4 comments:

abdul666 said...

Overt and, perhaps mainly, covert diplomacy is active and maybe can bring some hope: we act (and suggest others to act) simultaneously in three major directions:
- Duchess Isabel de Farnesio as the (not disinterested) figuredhead of a 'pacifist' movement in the Hispanian highest circles;

- influential people in Versailles revulsed by the barbaric 'Diezmo de horca' -specially Louis' morganatic wife and her confessor -but there Monte-Cristo has only indirect contacts, though we can exert pressure (from claiming reimbursement of debts to blackmail) on some well-placed people; action to be completed by spreding doubts in Philippe d'Orleans clique about the intents of Philip 'of Hispania' at the death of Louis;

- the Church (preferably at the highest level in order to put a pressure on both Gallian and Hispanian governments) to obtain a condemnation of the atrocities in a fratricide war between Roman Catholics; again Monte-Cristo is not in a favourable position to act directly, but we mobilize some debtors as intermediate, and the Austrian Court & some people (prelates?) in so far Austria-controlled Italy could be influential. Underline that 'violence only feed violence', that a potential ascending spiral of inter-Catholics atrocities has to be halted (re. images of Goya's drawings...).
A renewal of Muslim 'activities' -not from the Ottomans, who would handicap the Empire, but from the Barbary Coast- could highlight the criminal foolishness of such bloody division of Christianity in the area -this perhaps Monte-Cristo can manage, a good part of the barbaresques' bounty is received in the Presipality, sometimes even laundered into numbered accounts in the Presipapal bank...

Soldadets said...

Wise suggestions, worth to be filed into Galatan diplomatic plans...

Salvador said...

Will we get to see a fierce land battle near Cardona? Will Marquis del Poal make such a bold move? Will Tivissa defenders be able to escape?
Unnerving, Msr. Vilalta. Thrilling...

Salvador said...

While I have to warn Monte Cristan diplomats about Isabel de Farnese, an overtly ambitious woman who couldn't care less about other than own's welfare and that of her descendancy, the other ways look fine.
Could I suggest to sound out the Duc d'Orleans? He may have fallen out of grace with the king but he is both an intelligent man with ambition and the former superior of the Catalan Army supreme commander, Msr. Villarroel. He knows the king is about to pass out, and surely will want and need every and each resource and contact to accomplish his will of becoming a regent of France.
He may have retained some fondness for Villarroel, and ending the Catalan affair without giving too much ground for Phillip, who is to be his sure enemy, and with an apparent victory for France, even if it's just a diplomatic one, can be a boon for both his popularity and his status as a man of state. And then there's the fact France could always use Catalunya as a beach head into spanish territory should ever that be needed as was the case a mere fifty years ago. Hell, even Louis XIVth surely will remember that for he was the king right then.