Thursday, October 07, 2010

New biography and uniform plates

I've made a little room and spent some time writing the biography of Lady Elisenda Folc de Cardona (a seductive character even for her creator), which can be found at the "Who is who" page of this weblog. It can be accessed from a link in the right side bar, too.

Besides, the "Army" page has been improved with some plates else (this time, those corresponding to Dragoons). I've also taken advantage on such update to re-classify the Infantry Regiments 8 to 10, and to add a short note at each plate's bottom specifying the degree of speculation or fiction in it.

I'll do my best to post a couple of further chronicles during this weekend, wish I find the time and inspiration for it. Thanks in advance for your warm support.

5 comments:

abdul666 said...

Lady Elisenda is indeed a fascinating character, a harbinger of both the Age of Reason and Equality of Man and Woman. Hope it will not backfire on her 'No one is a prophet in his own country'. Looking forward to learn of her achievements!

Very pleasant presentation of the army -an enjoyable diversity of uniforms colors.
The flags of the new IR 10 is weel done: your creation?
Then, if I may, IR9's name is in English in the title and in French on the colour: why not in Catalan in both cases?

Cheers and best wishes,
Jean-Louis

Jordi said...

Jean-Louis

About IR9, on the colour is in Catalan. But you are right that could be a good idea write the Catalan names everywhere.

abdul666 said...

'Filles' for daughter in Catalan as in French? No wonder understanding is so often easy and deep between Galatans and Monte-Cristans!

Soldadets said...

...Jean Louis, can you remember the first scene depecting Loys d'Hauteville? He spared his life thanks to started speaking his native 'Gascon' language, which could be understood by his illiterate captors...

Still to-day, a Southern French and a Catalan can understand to each other if speaking their native languages -with the condition not to use barbarisms... I can testimony this, when a few years ago visiting Carcassonne for tourism I was able to do so...

As a matter of fact, 18th century Provençal and Catalan must have been still astonishingly similar, for two countries politically separed for centuries. Even uncultivated people of that time was likely able to understand to each other.

abdul666 said...

And the shared troubadours heritage...