Wednesday, November 03, 2010

The Battle of Tivissa

Tivissa, 10th August 1713

On the first days of this week, the Catalan column lead by the Military Deputy of the Principality had left their encampment face to the walls of Tarragona city, and started a swift march towards the mountain range to the west, following the road leading to Ebro river -and eventually to the besieged town of Tivissa. On their way, the small army found a regiment of Spanish Dragoons, who withdrew at the sight of a numerically superior enemy. Although not the brightiest military leader in the Catalan Army, the Deputy understood he had a best chance to force their way towards the town under siege, and ordered his troops to start a restless pursuit on the enemy Dragoons, who at every occasion refused contact and evaded.

This way, the Military Deputy's force was able to get in sight of Tivissa town in a few days. After a quick glance to the besieging forces from a safe distance, it took to him no more than a couple of minutes to decide an attack plan. As a matter of fact, this was quite simple, because they had little chances of prevailing if performing some kind of more elaborate strategy. Therefore, the Catalan Dragoons of Sant Miquel Regiment irrupted as a lightning into the battlefield just after the pursued enemy cavalry, who nearly had no time to dismount and prepare a defence line. The veteran infantrymen of Concepció Regiment appeared shortly after the Dragoons, already formed in line and dangerously close to musket fire distance of the Spanish left wing.

Their first volley, whose deadly effect was exponentially increased by their threatening position behind the enemy rear, had a devastating effect on the Two Crowns' lines. Exultant for the unexpected arrival of reinforcement, the town defenders also performed a co-ordinated volley on the assaulting enemy battalions, whose ranks were decimated by a hell of bullets and canister. The front ranks of the three most advanced Bourbon battalions broke out and fled away face to the deadly hell falling upon them.

However, the Spanish army was far from demoralizing yet, because a fast maneuvre of a battalion of the French Régiment d'Anjou allowed filling the left wing gap, while a second Dragoons regiment -held in reserve so far- started an outflanking maneuvre on the Catalan column right wing. Soon, the whole battle line got covered by a dense powder cloud...

[The first "big" battle of our campaign is being played by e-mail, because we haven't miniatures enough yet; and this is a quite slow procedure, so that we'll be lasting a little bit to solve it... More news on the battle development & aftermath to come very soon]

3 comments:

abdul666 said...

Holding our breath....

Salvador said...

Damn! Please be kind with our health!
Don't keep this anxiety for too long!

Jeroen72 said...

Don't hurry him! The longer the wait, the better it is ;)